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Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust
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News Archive

Bringing Christmas to our Community Hospitals

Christmas Day is often spent at home with friends and family, but for hundreds of staff from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust it will just be another working day – all be it with added tinsel and turkey. 


Staff from the Trust, which runs the five community hospitals across the county and is the main provider of community and mental health care, will be going about their normal duties on Christmas Day as well as spreading some festive cheer where they can.  

Patients at the community hospitals can expect some exciting festivities. In Evesham hospital staff have arranged for Carole singers to visit on Christmas Eve and a visit from the Town’s Mayor on Christmas Day, and at The Princess of Wales Community Hospital in Bromsgrove staff are hosting a Michael Bublé tribute concert for patients and relatives, and a remembrance service for all relatives of patients on The Primrose Unit who have sadly passed away. 

In Malvern Community Hospital, staff have organised for the Salvation Army choir and Malvern singer’s choir to sing with patients. Pershore Hospital patients will receive a visit from the town Mayor who will hand out presents from the Friends of Pershore Hospital and the British Legion, there will be open visiting from 10am and a traditional Christmas dinner. Spouses who would otherwise be on their own at Christmas are able to join their husbands/wives for dinner.  While in Tenbury, hospital staff will be laying out a long table so patients can have the opportunity to dine together and they will all receive gifts to open on Christmas morning.

Philip Shakeshaft, Matron/Lead Nurse at The Trust, said: “Christmas Day is a special day and is time for friends and family to get together and celebrate. NHS staff work 365 days a year including Christmas, and we try our hardest to ensure all patients have the best day possible.” 

The Trust’s district nurses, who provide a range of care to patients in their own homes, will also be out and about doing patient visits on the big day. 

Julie Money, Primary Care Cluster Lead for the Trust, said: “During the Christmas period district nurses visit to carry out essential care for people in their own homes, including general care and support of patients who are at the end of their lives. The high quality care that we deliver during the year continues seamlessly through the holiday period ensuring wherever possible people can remain in their own homes. Patients always make us feel especially welcome in their homes at Christmas and we all feel particularly appreciated as we share this special time of the year with them.” 

The county’s Minor Injury Units will also be open as normal; for opening times and other information visit www.hacw.nhs.uk/MIU

The Trust’s new Healthy Minds website also provides information supporting people who are experiencing more common mental health issues, such as stress, anxiety and low mood. The site has self-help guides to help, and New Year courses which people can self-refer onto are now being advertised. Visit www.hacw.nhs.uk/healthyminds for more information.

Trust runs event to say thank you to its volunteers

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust ran an event last week to say thank you and Merry Christmas to all its volunteers.

Sue Harris (Director of Business Development), Sandra Brennan (Director of Quality), Stephen Collman (Director of Operations), Victoria Thurston (Clinical Psychologist)  and the Community Engagement and Patient Involvement Team, who organised the event, all attended as representatives of the Trust and thanked the volunteers for their hard work.

There are around 55 volunteers at various locations around the Trust and around 80 Locality Forum members, of which 30 attended the event at the King George V Community Centre in Worcester.

The volunteers roles include Leisure Facilitators who make hospital more enjoyable for patients, those who help with trolley rounds, Gardeners, Chaplain volunteers, general Ward helpers, Fundraisers and those who offer yoga classes, art therapy, tai chi etc. and the Locality Forums members who assist various Trust projects such as interviewing and working groups.

Sarah Dugan, Chief Executive of the Trust, said: “I’d like to say a huge thank you to all of our volunteers who give so freely of their precious time to support our patients. We really appreciate everything you do, from supporting patients directly, to helping with gardening or helping with formal processes such as our place inspections of our environments. Everything you do is really appreciated, so thank you for your on-going commitment.”

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is the main provider of community and mental health services in Worcestershire. We deliver a wide range of services in a variety of settings, including in people’s homes, care homes, schools, community centres, prisons and our in-patient facilities including our five community hospitals.

We provide services to people across all age groups from Health Visitor services for new born babies and their families to services which support older people with complex health and social care needs.
Thankyouvolunteers

Poor behaviour linked to poor communication

The last week of a campaign highlighting the importance of speech and language is focusing on the long-term impact that communication issues can cause.

In the final week of We Need To Talk Month, the Worcestershire Children’s Speech and Language team are emphasising the impact that communication issues can have on behaviour.

Worcestershire Children’s speech and language service, which is provided by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, offers help and support to those aged 0-19 who experience speech, language, communication or swallowing difficulties. It is thought that, within the county, around 12,000 people in this age range encounter long term difficulties.

Children and young people with communication difficulties can experience confusion, frustration, isolation and low self-esteem and all of these emotions can impact on their behaviour.  This can lead to further problems - two out of every three 7-14 year olds with severe behaviour difficulties have a language difficulty and 60-90% of young offenders have communication difficulties.

Jacqui Woodcock from the Children’s Speech and Language Team said, “Not understanding why things happen or being able to explain how you feel can be very frustrating. This frustration is often expressed in poor behaviour because the young person doesn’t know how else to communicate it.”

The team are holding an event on December 9th at The Arena in Worcester which will focus on the long term impact of a communication difficulty and what parents, teachers and therapists can all do to help these children overcome their difficulties and fulfil their potential.  

For more information about the team and  the campaign please visit http://www.hacw.nhs.uk/weneedtotalk

 

World Aids Day 2015 - Think positive: Rethink HIV 

The county’s sexual health team are reminding people that December 1st is World Aids Day.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust – the main provider of sexual health services within Worcestershire are asking people to mark the day which was the first global health awareness day.

This year the focus is on challenging the myths and outdated stereotypes that surround HIV and AIDS.

Despite the virus only being identified in 1984 around 35 million people globally have died from it and there are thought to be 34 million living with the viruses – 100,000 of those here in the UK. 

Today, scientific advances have been made in HIV treatment, there are laws to protect people living with HIV and we understand so much more about the condition. Despite this, each year in the UK around 6,000 people are diagnosed with HIV.

Although most people have heard of HIV and AIDS many do not know the facts about how to protect themselves and others and stigma and discrimination remain a reality for many people living with the condition.

Myths have circulated for a long time about HIV – who can contract it and how. HIV is still primarily caught through unprotected sex. About 17% of the people with HIV in the UK are unaware that they have it so using a condom every time when having any sexual contact is the only way to reduce the transmission of the virus in this way.

Other than unprotected sex the only other ways the HIV virus can be passed on is by sharing needles or from mother to child. HIV cannot be passed on through kissing, sharing cups with someone with HIV, hugging or public toilets.

Kate Wilson from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust said, “There was a time when being diagnosed with the condition meant that a person was likely to become increasingly unwell and their life expectancy was reduced. With the recent advances in medication and treatment people are now far more able to live long, fulfilled and healthy lives.

“We offer HIV screening across the County and would encourage anyone with any concerns to get themselves tested. An early diagnosis means early access to treatment and the best prognosis.”

For further information about local HIV screening please visit:

Arrowside unit, Alexandra Hospital Redditch.B98 7PB.
Tel: 01527 516398

John Anthony Centre, Newtown Road, Worcester WR5 1JF
Tel: 0300 123 1731

Sexual Health Service, Kidderminster Health Centre, DY10 1PG
Tel: 01562 514 512 

Trust welcomes new Medical Director

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s new Medical Director has vowed to help develop a “different way of delivering high quality healthcare for the people of Worcestershire.”

Dr Andy Sant has just joined the Trust from a similar post in Plymouth and brings with him a wealth of experience having trained and worked previously as a GP.  He has also run a community frailty unit in Plymouth and hopes to use this experience and knowledge to ensure more elderly, vulnerable patients here in Worcestershire receive the care and treatment they need at home or in the community.

Click here for more information . . .

Trust becomes first mental health provider to sign up to John’s Campaign

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust has become the first mental health inpatient provider in the UK to lend its support to a national campaign set up to give carers of those with dementia the right to stay with them in hospital or on wards.

The aim of John’s campaign is to give the carers of those living with dementia the right to stay with them in hospital, in the same way that parents stay with their sick children. It was launched in November 2014 after the death of Dr John Gerrard.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, which provides mental health services across the county including running inpatient units for those who can’t safely be supported at home, has become the first such provider to sign up to the campaign by piloting initiatives in its New Haven Mental Health Unit in Bromsgroveand on Athelon Ward in Worcester. This means carers of those people admitted to those environments will have the right to stay with them.

As well as offering the option for carers of those with dementia on these two wards, the Trust has also extended the principle to carers of those with functional mental health needs, such as schizophrenia, severe depression or psychosis.

Dr Natasha Lord, Clinical Psychologist for Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, said: “It is demonstrably clear that a hospital stay can be a distressing, scary and potentially damaging experience for a person with dementia or for those with mental health difficulties, and that the close involvement of their carers hugely improves the quality of their care.

Carers have an intimate knowledge of the patient and can support and comfort them. But these carers also need support, comfort and recognition, and at Worcestershire Health and Care Trust Older Patient Inpatient Mental Health Service, we are working to make this happen. We want to care for the carer.”

To encourage carer engagement, staff work with them to get a full life story of the vulnerable patient, finding out about their past work, their family life, their needs and preferences, likes and dislikes. When their relative or friend arrives on one of the Trust’s mental health wards they receive a carers’ leaflet so that they know what resources are available and what they can expect.

Carers can stay with the patient and there is also a carers’ room – a dedicated space, where carers can access information, find support and help, or stay overnight if this is what they need. Alongside this, the Trust has educational support for carers, giving books on prescription, links to external services and tailored sessions. In this way we hope to make carers into a valued and supported community.

There is a dedicated carer link on each ward, who will make initial contact with the families, ensure that a carer assessment has been offered and provide support throughout their loved one’s stay in hospital. If more intensive support is needed, this is provided and once a week staff hold a carers’ forum – a weekly informal drop-in where carers are actively asked to raise concerns or ask questions.

For more information about John’s Campaign visit: www.johnscampaign.org.uk

 

 

Playing is the best way for young children to learn 

Playing is the best way for a child to learn – that’s the message from the County’s Speech and Language Team.

As part of We Need to Talk Month - which is highlighting the importance of taking time to talk, listen and play with children to help develop their communication skills - the team are reminding parents that playing with your child is the best way to help them learn.

Worcestershire Children’s speech and language service, which is provided by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, offers help and support to those aged 0-19 who experience speech, language, communication or swallowing difficulties. It is thought that, within the county, around 12,000 people in this age range encounter long term difficulties.

Jacqui Woodcock from the Children’s Speech and Language Team said. “Play is fun but play is also how children learn - through play they learn about the world around them.

“It teaches them about cause and effect and most importantly play lets children take charge and influence their environment through their actions words.

“It can be tempting to think children are 'just playing' and feel we ought to move them on to something more 'educational' but there is no need to worry - time spent playing is well spent!”

With Christmas just around the corner the Children’s Speech and Language team have also provided a few helpful ideas for presents that can help children develop communication skills – books with sound effects, role play toys, rhyming books and a nursery rhymes CD.

For more information about the team, the campaign and to have a look at the Christmas list they have put together please visit http://www.hacw.nhs.uk/weneedtotalk


‘We Need to Talk’ month launches in the County

The Worcestershire Children’s Speech and Language team are launching a campaign this month which will emphasise the importance of talking and listening to children.

The Children’s speech and language service, which is provided by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, offers help and support to those aged 0-19 who experience speech, language, communication or swallowing difficulties. It is thought that, within the county, around 12,000 people in this age range encounter long term difficulties

The campaign will encourage parents to take time to talk, listen and play with children to help develop their communication skills and highlight certain things which can be a barrier to speech and language development.

Click Here For More Information

Use Minor Injury Units if it’s not an emergency

Residents with a minor injury are being urged to attend their local Minor Injury Unit, where there’s an average waiting time of around 20 minutes, instead of A&E this winter.

As the season approaches, slips, trips and falls are more common, and things like cuts, grazes, wounds, sprains, strains and minor burns can be treated in one of the county’s Minor Injury Units, relieving pressure on A&E.

Click here for more information

 

Local dementia nurse gets national recognition

A nurse who leads a team supporting families of people living with dementia in Worcestershire has been named a finalist in a prestigious National award.

Helen Springthorpe, who is Admiral Nurse team leader with Worcestershire Health and Care Trust’s, has been named a finalist in the National Dementia Care Awards 2015. She was nominated in the Best Dementia Nurse Specialist/Dementia Lead category by her colleagues, families affected by dementia, and by the Practice Development Lead for Admiral Nursing, who is based with the national charity, Dementia UK.

This award is for an ‘outstanding Dementia Nurse Specialist or Dementia Lead who shows an expert level of skill and knowledge and who has supported their colleagues in delivering high quality, safe, seamless dementia care’.

The awards, which have been running for 5 years, aim to acknowledge and reward those who have excelled working with people with dementia and the ceremony will take place in the middle of November.

Helen said: “The nomination for this award was a real surprise and I feel very honoured.”

The Admiral Nurses are registered mental health nurses who specialise in dementia nursing. They provide support to the person with dementia and much-needed practical and emotional support to the people who care for them.

Helen was the first Admiral Nurse in Worcestershire and established the team 12 years ago. The team is now an integral part of dementia services in the County.


Celebrating outstanding achievement of our NHS staff

New Haven Unit - Team of the Year
NHS staff from across Worcestershire have been recognised for their outstanding achievements at a really wild awards ceremony.

District Nurses, Dementia staff, Healthcare staff who work in prisons, the Community Dental Team and Facilities staff were all among the winners in Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s annual Staff Awards evening which this year took place in Tree Tops Pavilion in the heart of West Midlands Safari Park.

Click here to read more . . .

Developing local services for young people with dementia

An event was held in Worcestershire last week to discuss how to provide more targeted and appropriate care and support for younger people living with dementia and their families.  

The ‘Living Well with Dementia at a Younger Age’ event brought together people living with young onset dementia, families and carers and professionals from health, social care, the voluntary and independent sector, to discuss the work that has been undertaken over the last 18 months to develop support and services. The attendees were also asked to consider how this should be developed in the future.

Dementia is considered to be ‘young onset’ when it affects somebody under the age of 65. It’s thought there are nearly 400 people under 65 living with dementia in Worcestershire but only 150 are known to the service. 

Last week’s event, which was attend by around 65 people, was a follow-on from one held in April last year which looked at how services for people affected by this needed to develop. The requirements for services are really different as people living with dementia at this age are more likely to still be in full-time employment, have a mortgage or dependent children. People with dementia at a younger age often also experience less common forms of dementia.

Jenny La Fontaine, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Young Onset Dementia Development Officer, said: “The initial event last April laid the foundations for what we could do to provide more support and help for younger people who have dementia. This event looked to evaluate what we had done so far and build on that to see how we can move things forward.

We have worked really hard to raise awareness of the condition in the county and we have worked closely with many professionals to try to ensure that people get a timely diagnosis and importantly, the right support following diagnosis.

The challenges faced by a young person with dementia are different to those faced by an older person. They may still be working, they might have a younger family and may have different financial pressures such as mortgage repayments so we need to have that in mind when we plan services.”

Worcestershire Integrated Commissioning Unit is one of the few in the country to recognise the need for leadership to support the development of services for younger people with dementia and their families. Tangible progress has been made in bringing together many different professionals and agencies to work together in partnership to achieve real change.  

This has included setting up a website specifically for younger people living with dementia and their families www.youngonsetdementia-worcestershire.org.uk. An evening service has also been developed called Connection Point which runs at County Hall, from 7 to 9pm on every third Thursday of the month to provide information and support for those living with and supporting somebody with young onset dementia. 

To find out more about Young Onset dementia please visit the website or contact us on 01562 828894.

Chris Burdon

NHS Chairman’s tenure extended

The Chairman of the Trust which provides the majority of community nursing, therapy and mental health services throughout Worcestershire has had his tenure extended by a further 2 years.

Chris Burdon was appointed Chairman of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust when it was formed in 2011, and now the Trust Development Authority, responsible for appointing NHS Chairs and Non-Executive Directors, have confirmed that Mr Burdon’s new term will run until the end of June 2017. Click here to read more . . . .

Redditch event to promote Healthy Minds

Over 70 people converged on Redditch Town Hall on Wednesday evening to find out more about the services available to support those living with common mental health problems. Members of the new Worcestershire Healthy Minds service, spoke about the range of support available to help people living with things like stress, anxiety, low mood and depression.

Click Here for More Information

Fitness programme for mental health patients in Worcestershire up for national award

HSJ-Awards-2015--finalist-logo

A programme to boost physical health and fitness of local young people with psychosis and bipolar disorder has been shortlisted for one of the most prestigious and high profile awards in the health sector.
 
SHAPE, which stands for ‘Supporting Health And Promoting Exercise’, is run by staff from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust in partnership with the University of Worcester, South Worcestershire Clinical Commissioning Group and Worcestershire Public Health. It has just been announced that the programme has been shortlisted in the Innovation in Mental Health category in this year’s Health Service Journal’s (HSJ) Awards – the Oscars of the health sector.
 
SHAPE was launched in 2014 in the south of the county and is a 12-week health and fitness programme designed for young people with psychosis and bipolar disorder under the care of Worcestershire Early Intervention Service and South Worcestershire Recovery Service. SHAPE aims to help young people maintain or lose weight, stop smoking, start exercising, introduce healthier eating and to support young people to achieve personal health goals.
 
Many people experiencing psychosis face a future restricted not only by mental illness but also by poor physical health.  Despite many advances in our understanding of psychosis over the last few decades, those affected still face a 15-20 year life expectancy gap from the general population. In particular, higher rates of obesity, cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes contribute to a widening health gap. 
 
SHAPE employs nutritionists, exercise physiologists and health trainers and utilises student and peer group support to offer a wellbeing and exercise programme in a youth focused, socially inclusive university gym setting at the McClelland Centre on the University of Worcester City Campus. The programme offers participants health MOT’s, fitness assessments and advice, including access to exercise physiologists, sports therapists, smoking cessation advisors and nutritionists offering dietary advice and nutritional therapy. As well as the structured, intensive, group intervention delivered weekly over 12 consecutive weeks the programme also offers participants the opportunity to take up a free gym membership at the McClelland Centre for a further 12 months.
 
Such has been the success of SHAPE in south Worcestershire that the team are rolling the programme out across the county. Earlier this week a programme in Wyre Forest being run in partnership with Stourbridge Metropolitan College was launched giving more young people with mental health difficulties to chance to improve their health and fitness.
 
Marie Band, from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Early Intervention Team, said: “Since launching SHAPE those who have accessed the programme have experienced real physical health benefits and it’s clear that it also helps boost confidence and self-esteem. SHAPE is a really good example of different teams working together with service users to design something which is having real tangible benefits and we’re really pleased to see SHAPE being rolled out wider so more people can make the most of the support it provides. One of the Trust’s key aims is to promote parity between mental and physical health so we’re thrilled that the programme has been recognised in such a high profile way.”
 
Representatives from the SHAPE team will attend a ceremony in London in November when the winners of the award will be announced.

For more information on the SHAPE programme visit: www.hacw.nhs.uk/SHAPE

Residents invited to event as part of Worcestershire Healthy Minds Month

7th September 2015_Healthy Minds Event img

The county’s main provider of mental health NHS services is inviting residents to an event to find out more about support available to help people living with stress, anxiety and low mood as part of a month-long campaign.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is dedicating September as its Healthy Minds Month where it will be raising awareness of support provided by its Healthy Minds Service, which helps people, aged 16 and over, who are experiencing these more common mental health problems which, it’s estimated, affects around 1 in 4 of us. Click Here for More . . .

Mid-Life cyclists raising money for local Admiral Nurses

Mid Life Cyclists
A group of novice cyclists are making the final preparations before attempting to pedal 110 miles in just 2 days – all in the name of Worcestershire’s dedicated fleet of Admiral Nurses.  


The group, or as they like to call themselves, the Mid-life Cyclists, are cycling around Worcestershire and Gloucestershire this weekend in a bid to raise money for the specialist dementia nurses who are part of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust. Admiral Nurses are registered mental health nurses who specialise in dementia, and as well as providing support to the person with dementia they also provide much-needed practical and emotional support to the people who care for them. Click Here for More . . .

Free health check service to improve staff wellbeing

Employers across the county are being offered the chance to provide their staff with a free health check at work thanks to a local health provider.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust have a team of health checkers travelling around the county offering free health checks to those aged 40-74 and they’d like to come to your workplace. The checks last around 20 minutes and tests for blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes are carried out. Click Here for More . . . .

Free course available to help those with low mood and anxiety

A course helping people in Malvern deal with low mood and anxiety is all set to begin next month.

The free 11 week workshop is being run by Healthy Minds, part of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust – the main provider of mental health services within the County. It aims teaches skills in managing difficult thoughts and feelings and encourages people to move towards a life which has meaning and purpose through a focus on values and goal setting. Click Here for More Information

NHS Board member retires after more than 50 years of public service

A Worcestershire resident and former vice chairman of NHS Worcestershire who has recently sat on the Board of the county’s main provider of community nursing and mental health NHS services is retiring following a distinguished career in public service. Click Here for More Information.

NHS Trust looking for new Board member

Sitting on the Board of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, the county’s main provider of community nursing, therapy and mental health services, Non-Executive Directors have a unique role to play in ensuring care and support to communities across Worcestershire are safe, effective and financially sustainable. Click Here For More . . . .

Trust set for AGM

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, which provides community nursing, therapy and mental health services throughout the county, is holding its Annual General Meeting in Wyre Forest on July 8th. 

Members of the public are welcome to attend where they will hear more about the Trust’s performance during the 2014/15 financial year, including a presentation from one of the organisation’s senior clinicians.

Click here for more.

Learning Disability Day hailed a great success

Learning Disabilities Day

A learning disability day which took place in Worcester this week has been hailed a huge success by organisers and attendees

The event took place in and around the King George V Community Centre in Ash Avenue on Wednesday and saw over 250 people who access LD services, and their families/carers, enjoy music, sports and a chance to meet new friends. It was organised by staff from the Community Learning Disability team which includes staff from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust and Worcestershire County Council. Together, they help to look after almost 2,000 people living with learning disabilities in the county.

Click Here For More

Admiral Nurses set to launch new single point of access to those living with dementia

Worcestershire’s Admiral Nurses are launching a new single point of access from June 1st to support those cares and families looking after loved ones with dementia.

Click Here for More Information

Admiral-nurses-logo2

Worcestershire Admiral Nurses - Helping you care well

On Wednesday, May 20th over 90 people, both social and health professionals as well as members of the general public attended the event at the Charles Hastings Education Centre in Worcester, which saw staff from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Admiral Nurses team deliver a presentation on the support they provide to the families of people living with dementia.

Click Here for More Information

Service helping people with mental ill health back to work described as ‘exemplary’

IPS-Team

A service run by the County’s leading provider of community and mental health services which helps get those with mental health illnesses back into meaningful employment has been hailed as ‘exemplary’ in a recent national review.  

Click Here For More Information

Mental Health Awareness Week: Mindfulness-based therapy available for people in County

Worcestershire residents are now able to sign up to a course that provides this alternative way of dealing with depression and stress.

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week, with a particular focus on mindfulness - an integrative, mind-body based training that helps people to change the way they think and feel about their experiences.

Click Here For More Information

Trust on target to meet ambitious carbon reduction plan

The Trust which runs community nursing and mental health services in Worcestershire is on plan to meet an ambitious target to reduce its carbon emissions by 20% by the end of 2015. 

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s  Carbon Management Plan was launched in 2011 with the aim of developing new projects to reduce its carbon footprint by just under 1500 tonnes of CO2. Over the last 4 years, the Trust has already reduced its CO2 emissions by 1193 tonnes.

Click Here For More Information

Tenbury MIU – Opening Times Reminder

Tenbury residents are being reminded about the recent changes to the opening times at the town's Minor Injury Unit. 

In March following a consultation with local residents and stakeholders the Unit, based at Tenbury Community Hospital and run by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, moved to new opening times of 9am until 9pm, 7-days a week.

Click Here For More Information

Shortlisted Badge

Local NHS Comms team in the running for national award

The team tasked with providing information to patients and staff of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust has been shortlisted for a national Team of the Year award this week.

The Trust is the county’s main provider of community and mental health services and its Marketing and Communications Team has been shortlisted in a Team of Year category in this year’s UK Public Sector Communications Awards. The  awards celebrate and reward excellent communication strategies and campaigns, teams and individuals in local and national government, emergency services and not-for-profit bodies from across the UK.

Worcester News Article

Click Here for More Information

Admiral-nurses-logo2

Worcestershire Admiral Nurses - Helping You Care Well

Worcestershire residents are invited to find out about the services their local Admiral Nursing team provide to the families of people living with dementia. 

On Wednesday, May 20th staff from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Admiral Nurses team will deliver a presentation at the Charles Hastings Education Centre in Worcester. The event will discuss a range of issues related to caring for someone with dementia, and will include guest speakers who have experienced the challenges of caring with a loved one who has dementia and who have also received support from the Admiral Nursing team. 

Click Here For More Information

Click Here to View the Event Poster

NHS Trust gives care homes staff vital advice on oral health of older adults

As part of a new national training programme, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Community Dental Service has been raising awareness of how to improve the oral health of older adults in care homes, which can ultimately prevent other health problems.

The number of older people in the population, including dependent older people continues to rise, and many older people are now retaining their natural teeth, which makes caring for their mouth more challenging for care staff.

Click here for more information

NHS Trust staff given vital mental health and wellbeing support 

Staff from the county’s main provider of community and mental health services are being offered a wide range of support to prevent and manage mental health issues.

It was recently revealed that staff absences for mental health reasons across NHS Trusts in England had doubled, leading to calls for organisations to do more to support their employees. But between 2013 and 2015 sickness days attributed to mental health issues within Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust had stayed about the same, with no significant increase.

Click here for more information

Worcestershire NHS helps young people ‘Get Into’ healthcare

Two healthcare organisations in Worcestershire hosted a Prince’s Trust work experience programme for unemployed young people trying to get into work.

Throughout March, Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust and Worcestershire Health and Care Trust supported twelve people, aged 18 – 25, through a mixture of work experience on hospital wards and taught sessions.

 Click here for more information.

 Nurses play key role in Trust efficiency plan 

The NHS Trust which runs community nursing, therapy and mental health services in Worcestershire has saved more than £300k by changing the way it buys and orders goods and services - and has put clinical staff at the heart of identifying more opportunities.

Click here for more information

King's Speech cast supports local NHS Trust’s campaign to raise awareness of children’s communication needs

SLT King's Speech

The stage version of an Oscar winning film –including Jason Donovan- has endorsed a campaign run by Speech and Language Therapists from the county’s main provider of community and mental health services to raise awareness of communications needs across the children’s workforce.

 Click here for more information

Non-Executive Directors re-appointed to NHS Trust Board

The NHS Trust Development Authority (NHS TDA) has today confirmed the re-appointments of Martin Connor and Peter Lachecki as Non-Executive Directors of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust.

Click here for more information

Norma Brown

Helping people live well with leg ulcers

A new club for treating lower leg conditions such as ulcers has been set up in Dines Green to support patients to get back on their feet.

The Leg Club in Dines Green was launched in January. It runs every Tuesday from ‘The Green Centre’ and sees local patients drop in to get leg ulcers, chronic oedema and lymphoedema, dry skin and other associated conditions checked and treated by a team of District Nurses from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust.

Click here for more information

Tenbury

Tenbury MIU opening times to change

Following a public consultation the opening times of the Minor Injury Unit (MIU) in Tenbury, which is based at the town’s Community Hospital, will change from Monday, March 9th 2015.

Towards the end of 2014 residents were asked for their views on proposals to shut the unit overnight and change to opening hours of 9am until 9pm, 7 days a week. There were no major objections to the plans, with respondents voting 3:2 in favour of the change. The changes were also supported by local GPs. 

Click here for more information

Local health organisations team up to provide bettre care for patients

A new alliance of local healthcare organisations has been formed in South Worcestershire to reduce unnecessary emergency admissions and improve the overall care for older and more vulnerable patients.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust -the county’s main provider of community and mental health services- and Stay Well Healthcare -the GP Federation representing practices in South Worcestershire- is creating a new service to deliver better care for older people aged over 75 and those deemed more vulnerable. Ultimately its aim is to reduce unnecessary emergency admissions. 

Click here for more information

ABC Dementia

Dementia book selected for groundbreaking national program

A guide edited by specialist staff from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust - the county’s main provider of community and mental health services - to help people live well with dementia has been selected to be part of a national ground-breaking scheme to support people with dementia and their carers.

The 25 titles on the Reading Well Books on Prescription for Dementia list was unveiled on Monday 26th January at an official launch in London. It includes the ABC of Dementia, edited by Dr Felicity Richards and Dr Bernard Coope, both Consultant Older Adult Psychiatrists in Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust.

Click here for more information.

Patients urged to visit local Minor Injury Unit as icy weather causes increase in slips and falls

During cold spells, minor injuries from slips, trips and falls on the ice such as bumps, bruises and sprains are very common. Worcestershire residents who have a minor ailment or have suffered a minor injury are being urged to attend their local Minor Injury Unit, where the average waiting time is less than 20 minutes.

If more people with minor injuries used this service it would free up capacity at A&E so staff there can support those people who do need emergency care. And it is likely the total time spent in a visit - including travel - will be less than that spent at A&E.

Click here for more information.

Trust promotes greater transparency by displaying staffing levels on wards

As part of its commitment to being open and transparent with its patients, the county’s main provider of community and mental health services has this week installed information screens outside each of its hospital wards sharing information on nurse staffing levels.

The information will help reassure patients that the wards have enough staff to cope with demand.

Click here for more information

Self Harm Banner3

Self-Help, not Self-Harm in Worcestershire

Worcestershire residents are invited to an event to help understand and respond to the sharp rise in the numbers of children in Worcestershire self-harming.

On Thursday, February 12th staff from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service) will deliver a presentation at the Charles Hastings Education Centre in Worcester.

Click here for more information

FFT banner

91% of patients would recommend Trust's services, survey shows

Latest results from an NHS survey has revealed that over 90% of patients and service users would be happy to recommend services provided by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust to their friends and family.

The Friends and Family Test (FFT) was rolled out across Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust – the county’s main provider of community and mental health services - on January 1st 2015 to allow patients to give quick, anonymised feedback on the quality of the care they receive. 

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Patients given opportunity to help improve NHS services 

Residents who receive services from Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust – the county’s main provider of community and mental health services - can give quick, anonymised feedback on the quality of the care they receive following the launch of a new ‘Friends and Family Test’ (FFT).

The FFT, which is voluntary and anonymous, asks if people would recommend the services they access to their friends or family. Patients can give their feedback using a short paper survey after their appointment/admission, by returning a postcard, or online at www.surveymonkey.com/s/YOURFFT.

Click here for more information

MIU Malvern

Local Minor Injuries Unit given "10/10 for everything, including waiting times"

Malvern residents who need medical treatment or advice which is not an emergency should visit the local Minor Injuries Unit (MIU) at Malvern Community Hospital, where the average waiting time is less than 20 minutes.

Patients with a wide range of minor injuries including cuts, grazes, wounds, sprains, strains and minor burns can be treated at the MIU, which is run by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust.

Click here for more information

Sexual infections on the rise in the over 45s

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is launching a new campaign encouraging people over 45to practice safe sex.

In England, Chlamydia rates for people in the 45-64 age bracket have increased by 87% between 2009 and 2013.
West Midlands figures show the same trend with a 148% increase in diagnosis of Chlamydia, which contrast with falling rates of Chlamydia in young people aged 15-24. 

Similarly, rates of Genital Herpes in the West Midlands for the 45-64 age group have more than doubled between 2009 and 2013 while Gonorrhoea diagnoses have almost tripled.

Click here for more information

NHS Trust in Worcestershire contribute to new national guidance on dementia


Members of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Early Intervention Dementia Service have been involved in a leading national study aiming to help improve the care provided topeople living with dementia.

Friday 5th December saw the launch at the British Psychological Society’s Division of Clinical Psychology Annual Conference of a new study aiming to reduce stigma and uncertainty around dementia and promote best practices to enable people to live well with dementia.

Click here for more information

Dummy Elf

Trust urges toddlers to ditch their dummies

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Children Speech and Language Therapy service is running a Dummy Elf initiative to raise awareness of the impact dummies have on children’s early speech and language development.

 

As part of their Get Worcestershire Talking campaign, which aims to raise awareness of communication needs across the children’s workforce, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Dummy Elves have been out and about in the county collecting dummies from children who are too big to need them any longer.

Click here for more information

Trust’s dental service helps detect signs of cancer

Dental Mobile

Throughout November, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Community Dental Service offered free check-ups as part of a national awareness campaign - and detected two possible cases of mouth cancer.

During national Mouth Cancer Action Month (in November), the Community Dental Service took its mobile unit to the Trust’s five community hospitals and offered free checks as well as information about the common symptoms of mouth cancer.

Out of the 136 patients they saw, two had suspicious symptoms and have been referred to the Head and Neck Cancer Service at Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust. A few others had minor indicators of disease and were urged to get checked up regularly.

Click here for more information

Trust saves nearly £1million by reducing estate costs

The Trust which runs community nursing and mental health services in Worcestershire has saved nearly £1million by reducing the cost of running and maintaining its estate.

The NHS this week published data which outlines how much Trusts spend on buildings, including energy and water consumption as well as on-going maintenance. It is part of a national initiative to increase transparency and encourage further efficiency savings.

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Question Time

Worcestershire schoolchildren taken to Houses of Parliament as part of communication competition

4 children across Worcestershire were taken to the Houses of Parliament as part of a Worcestershire Question Time competition organised by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Children’s Speech and Language Therapy.

The competition was open to all schools in Worcestershire where children were asked to think of an original, appropriate and well-formed question to ask their local MP. 

Click Here For More Information 

Digital Impressions  Image

DIGITAL IMPRESSIONS EXHIBITION – SHRUB HILL WORKSHOP

Shrub Hill Workshop is holding a “Digital Impressions” exhibition until the 16th November: Commandery, Sidbury, Worcester WR1 2HU. 10am-5pm Mon-Sat, 1.30-5pm Sunday

Digital Impressions Exhibition is a collection of digital photographs produced by students during a 19-week digital photography course organised by Shrub Hill Workshop. The exhibition includes pictures of Worcester Woods, Spetchley Park and Gardens, Worcester Cathedral and Avon Croft Museum. Shrub Hill Workshop has had 8 students taking part in the courses this year, between them taking approximately 10,000+ images. After the course, the students are encouraged to continue with their photography meeting regularly as a group. For more info please contact Brian Bullock - Brian.Bullock@hacw.nhs.uk or 01905 610934. Click Here For The Exhibition Poster

Mouth Cancer Check November Image

NHS Trust offers free checks to raise awareness of mouth cancer

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Community Dental Service is taking part in Mouth Cancer Action Month, which aims to raise awareness of a disease that claims more lives each year than road traffic accidents.

Throughout November, the Trust’s Community Dental Service will educate members of the general public about mouth cancer and promote the message "if in doubt, get checked out" in a bid to save lives through early detection. 

Click Here For More Information

SLT image

Pupils encouraged to put down their pens to develop listening and speaking skills

Children from nursery age to high school across Worcestershire put down their pens and picked up language in support of No Pens Day Wednesday, a national initiative to promote the importance of speaking and listening.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Children’s Speech and Language Therapy organised a day for pupils across 18 schools where all learning and assessment took place through speaking and listening, rather than writing.

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C.Diff Team Pic

Worcestershire C-diff group scoop national award

An NHS task group which has nearly halved the number of C-Diff infections in Worcestershire has scooped a national award. The Worcestershire Health Economy C-diff Task and Finish Group has just been named winner of the Infection Prevention Society’s National Team of the Year award.

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Wolfrun

Award-winning dementia team make a splash to raise money

Members of a Worcestershire NHS team which is leading the way nationally in providing early diagnosis and support for those with dementia got caked in mud last week to help improve services for younger people affected.

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NewHaven Opening

Duchess of Gloucester opens NHS Trust’s ‘state-of-the-art’ mental health unit

A mental health unit in Bromsgrove for older people with dementia or other mental health illnesses was given the Royal seal of approval at its official opening this week.

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Talking Miles More

Language therapists exceed their £500 fundraising target for children with communication disorders

Three Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Speech and Language Therapists took the saddle last week to raise money for children with communication disorders. 

The team has almost doubled its £500 fundraising target and raised £917 to make a new a library of games and resources that families with children with SLCN can borrow and play at home to develop their communication skills.

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Sexual Health Image

NHS Trust launches new sexual health campaign for Freshers’ Week

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS is urging new students to get tested at their closest sexual health clinic for free and confidential advice about sexual health if they are concerned that they may have put themselves at risk of a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) or need emergency contraception.

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Community Services

Trust Seeks Views on Community Services

Residents are being invited to share their views on the delivery of community nursing and therapy services provided by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust. The Trust provides a range of nursing and therapy services which are delivered in community settings, many in patient’s own homes.

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Language therapists to tackle 55-mile cycle ride to raise money for children with communication disorders
Emela and Liz
Emela and Liz

Three Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Speech and Language Therapists will be taking to the saddle next month to raise money for children with communication disorders.

Emela Milne, Liz Chatterton and Katie Watson will be cycling 55 miles from Tenbury to Bretforton on Friday, September 5 as part of the Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) service’s Get Worcestershire Talking campaign, which aims to raise awareness of speech, language and communications needs (SLCN) across the children’s workforce.

The team aims to raise £500 to make a new a library of games and resources that families with children with SLCN can borrow and play at home to develop their communication skills.

Please support Emela, Liz and Katie by donating at Just Giving - www.justgiving.com/Emela-Milne/

Emela Milne, Speech and Language Therapist, said: “Improving a child’s language dramatically improves their life chances. For example, there is no better predictor of a child’s GCSE results at 16 than their vocabulary at 5. That’s why it is so crucial to help these children develop their talking skills not only at school but also at home. “

Speech and Language Therapists are the lead professionals working with children and young adults with speech, language and communication difficulties. They work in partnership with parents, schools, and other professionals to reduce the impact of these difficulties and help children achieve their full potential. Last year, 2,400 Worcestershire children were referred to the service, with over 6,000 children known to the SLT Service at any moment in time. 

Emela, Liz and Katie will be calling at:

  • 09:15: Start at Tenbury Primary school, Bromyard Road, Tenbury Wells WR15 8BS
  • 12:30-13:00: Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s headquarters
    Isaac Maddox House, Shrub Hill Road, Worcester, WR4 9RW (Departing at 100 -13-30)
  • 13:00-15.00: St Barnabas First & Middle, Drakes Broughton WR10 2AW (Departing at 15:00-15:30)
  • 16:30-17:00: Fleece Inn, The Cross, Bretforton, Evesham, Worcestershire WR11 7JE


You can follow the SLT team on Twitter and Facebook. For more info on the Children’s Speech and Language Therapy, please click here

NHS Physiotherapists help Bromsgrove patient make it to the Commonwealth Games

A patient of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Community Paediatric Physiotherapy service was selected to represent England in the 2014 Commonwealth Games which closedearlier this month. She came 9th in the final of the women’s T54* 1,500m.

When she heard the news, Lauren Rowles, from Cofton Hackett, was very keen to recognise the dedication of her physiotherapy team – who took annual leave and flew up to Scotland to support her – and the role they have played in this achievement.
Lauren and her Physiotherapists
Lauren and her Physiotherapists, Rachel Schieber (left) and Alex Webster (right) at the Commonwealth Games

The 16-year-old said:“It was massive honour to be selected. I would like to thank my Physiotherapists, Rachel Schieber and Alex Webster, most of all because without them I wouldn't be racing at the Glasgow Games or racing at all. With their on-going support and help I have gone from being totally dependent on a carer to now being totally independent which has enabled me to do amazing things in my life.”

Lauren’s mum also thanked the team and said: “I want you to know as her mom I couldn't have been strong and encouraged her without you guys. No amount of thanks would cover what you have done”.

Rachel Schieber, Team Leader for Community Paediatric Physiotherapy Redditch and Bromsgrove Locality, said: “We are in a unique and privileged position as Paediatric Physiotherapists to be able to support not only the patient but the family and I feel part of our success is measured by having functional families.
Lauren's experience has contributed to our push to encourage our young people to participate in sport as a way of improving health, wellbeing and self-esteem and become independent and responsible for their own health as they transition to adulthood.” 

Paediatric Physiotherapists work with children and young people aged 0 to 19 years who have mobility difficulties and/or pain. It includes helping children with delayed movement skills such as rolling or walking, rehabilitation following trauma or surgery and helping with long term neurological and developmental conditions such as brain injuries.
Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust has 3 Paediatric Physiotherapy services – in Worcester, Redditch and Kidderminster. For more information about this service, please click here

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is also the main sponsor of the 2014 City of Worcester Sport Awards, which recognises an individual or a team who has shown great dedication or excelled in sport over the last year.

* Disability sport classification for disability athletics.

Black and White Baby Image

Local breastfeeding campaign launched as part of global awareness week 

The Trust which provides the majority of community and mental health NHS services in Worcestershire is teaming up with the county’s Public Health service to highlight the importance of breastfeeding. 

A campaign, which will run from August to November 2014, aims to inform new mums and their relatives in Worcestershire of the general importance of breastfeeding both for them and their new babies. The launch this week coincides with World Breastfeeding Week which runs until August 7. As well as posters which will be displayed in children’s centres, libraries, coffee shops, the University of Worcester’s Fresher Fair, GP surgeries, pharmacies and supermarkets, the Trust will run a social media campaign on Facebook and Twitter. 

The overall campaign will cover three themes. In September information will focus on future and soon-to-be mums to raise awareness of some of the health and other benefits of breastfeeding for both mother and baby. October’s push will target people who support and influence mums e.g. dads, partners, grandparents and friends, while November will encourage new mums to keep it up and continue breastfeeding after the first 6 weeks, which is when rates tend to drop off. 

Evidence shows that the longer the mother breastfeeds, the more pronounced the health benefits for both mother and baby will be.  Currently around 72% of babies in Worcestershire initially start breastfeeding but this drops to 44% by the time the baby is six weeks old.Exclusive breastfeeding is recommended up to six months of age. 

Anthea Griffiths, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Breastfeeding Coordinator for the county, said: “There are many evidenced based benefits of breastfeeding for the physical and emotional wellbeing of both mother and baby, and this campaign is about ensuring people have the right information to make the best choice. Breastfeeding gives babies the best possible start in life and we want to make mums and those around them aware of the support available to get them started and to keep it up past the first few weeks.” 

Councillor Marcus Hart, Cabinet Member for Health and Well-being for Worcestershire County Council, said:

"In Worcestershire, about three-quarters of women breastfeed when their babies are first born, but this drops to less than half by the time the babies are 6 weeks old.  Breastfeeding brings many health benefits to babies and mothers, and the Health and Well-being Board fully supports this initiative which will spread the word widely across the County.  It is not just about mothers. Fathers, grandparents and friends can all support women to breastfeed and local businesses such as restaurants can make sure that breastfeeding women  are welcome.  It would be great to see a real improvement in the numbers who breastfeed so that most women in Worcestershire are breastfeeding their babies for the first few months of life." 

Caroline Payne, Specialist Midwife- Infant Feedingat theAlexandra Hospital, Redditch said: “'It is great to be part of this initiative. We are passionate about providing good information to the families living in Worcestershire around feeding and caring for their baby. Breastfeeding is a learnt skill, with the commitment and support of the people around you, you are more likely to be successful and it will be a positive experience. Mums to be need to find out as much as they can prior to the birth of their baby as this gives them knowledge and empowers them to do the best for their baby. There are 'feeding your baby' workshops and support groups across Worcestershire, where breastfeeding is normal. You can find out where they are from your midwife ,health visitor or the Trust website.”

 For more information visit www.hacw.nhs.uk/breastfeeding

SHAPE Team

Innovative programme gets young people with mental illness in SHAPE 

As research has evidenced that people with psychosis are at a much higher risk than their peers for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease, a project supporting young people across Worcestershire who have a mental illness get active and healthy was officially launched last month. 

SHAPE (Supporting Health and Promoting Exercise) is a physical health programme aimed at young people who have Psychosis or Bipolar Disorder. 

Through group and individual exercise as well as wellbeing sessions, it encourages young people with Psychosis to be active, get and stay physically fit and to generally lead more healthy lifestyles which will help prevent diabetes and cardio-vascular problems often associated with younger people with Mental illness. 

The SHAPE Programme is being run in a partnership between Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust - the county’s main provider of NHS mental health services - the University of Worcester, Worcestershire County Council’s Public Health Department and South Worcestershire Clinical Commissioning Group. 

SHAPE brings together healthcare professionals including Sports Therapists, Exercise Physiologists, Nutritionists and Health Trainers. It gets young people to support each other through a 12-week exercise, health and fitness programme followed by continued free gym membership at McClelland Centre for 12 months. 

Professor Jo Smith, Consultant Clinical Psychologist and SHAPE Project Lead said :
"The Healthy Active Lives (HeAL) International Consensus Statement reported that weight gain, cardiovascular risk and metabolic problems appear early in the course of psychosis and are potentially modifiable. They advocate a holistic, preventative approach to address risk factors and reduce physical health inequalities. This is exactly what we are seeking to do through the Worcestershire SHAPE programme to support young people with psychosis to become fitter and healthier to assist in the prevention of these longer term health risks and ensure that these young people have the same life expectancy and expectations of life as peers who have not experienced psychosis." 

There are over 60 new cases of a first episode of psychosis per year across Worcestershire. SHAPE is available to all young people with a first episode of Psychosis living within the county and under the Worcestershire Early Intervention Service.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust reaches milestone

Nurses

Partners and other stakeholders have been sharing their views of the county’s main provider of community and mental health services to help it mark its third anniversary. 

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust was established in July 2011 in response to the Department of Health’s ‘Transforming Community Services’ initiative. It delivers a wide range of services in a variety of setting including in people’s own homes, care homes, schools, community centres, prisons and in in-patients facilities including five community hospitals.  

As part of the Trust marking its third milestone it invited local partners to share their experiences of working with the organisation over the last few years.

Jane Longmore, Business Development Manager at Age UK Herefordshire and Worcestershire, an independent charity working with and for the over 50s, their families, friends, and carers, said: “Age UK Herefordshire & Worcestershire have been working in partnership with Worcestershire Health & Care NHS Trust since its inception three years ago. The professionalism, expertise and engagement offered by staff has enhanced our knowledge, developed collaborative opportunities and ultimately enabled older people to access quality services in a timely and effective manner to support their on-going health and wellbeing.” 

Jim Bulman, Chairman of South Worcestershire Community Forum, which ensures patients have the opportunity to be involved, said:       

“During the past three years Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust has put into practice some new and innovative ideas, all of which are designed to improve the health and well-being of the patients and carers as well as the staff. These have been very successful and well received by all. There are still some changes to make and it is not possible to do everything at once, but I am very confident that this Trust will get there. Well done, keep up the good work.” 

The Trust’s Youth Board was set up a year ago. Its main responsibilities are to improve young peoples’ experiences of using the Trust’s services by providing views, recommendations and feedback about services.  

Youth Board members from Christopher Whitehead Language College said:  “The Trust has been a great help to us, despite our short period of time in link with it. Already it has been a fantastic occurrence being part of the NHS Youth Board and although we’ve only been members for a short amount of time, we feel welcomed and as though our views and our beliefs are always valid and required. We can’t wait to see even bigger improvements in time for the Trust’s 4th birthday in a year’s time”. 

The priority for providing high quality care has always been central to the Trust’s vision and values. Some of the Trust’s key achievements over the past 3 years include:

  • The opening of a new ‘state of the art’ in-patient unit, New Haven in Bromsgrove, for older people with dementia and other forms of mental illness,
  • Creating a Youth Board to improve young people’s experience of using the Trust’s services,
  • Our services which support people with mental health problems being given a seal of approval by the Royal College of Psychiatry’s prestigious accreditation programme,
  • 89% of patients who have accessed our Minor Injuries Units being extremely satisfied with the service they received,
  • Our Early Intervention in Dementia Service, which provide early assessment, diagnosis and support for people with dementia, winning a national innovation award,
  • 93% of Community Stroke Service patients being very satisfied with the advice and support provided by the team,
  • The refurbishment of the Holt ward, which boasts a new outdoor environment to support mental health patients on their road to recovery.

 

Sarah Dugan, Chief Executive, said: “The three years have gone incredibly quickly but I believe we have made great strides in achieving what we were established to do, which was to bridge the gap between physical and mental health. There are still many challenges to overcome and lots of pressures on services but our commitment to continue to improve and provide the best services we can is stronger than ever.”

www.hacw.nhs.uk/

Trust saves £250k by changing the way it buys goods and services

WHCT Procurement Team
The Trust Procurement Team

The Trust which provides the majority of community and mental health NHS services in Worcestershire has revealed savings of around £250k as a result of changes made to the way it procures goods and services. 

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Procurement Team was established in 2013 and set about changing the way the Trust purchased goods, including stationery, medical equipment, clinical gloves & wipes, and paper and ink cartridges. Over £46,000 has been saved against standard stationery items and more than £93,000 on printer cartridges.  

The savings come at a time when the first NHS efficiency league table has been made public, revealing huge disparity in the way trusts procure items and services, leading to significant waste in some areas.  

The data, published for the first time, compares spending by 244 NHS trusts (mainly acute trusts) on a 100 of the most common products.  The figures suggest that overall more than £1bn could be saved across the NHS from its £14 billion budget. 

Jeremy Pewton, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Procurement, said: “The Trust is really committed to saving money in a way which maintains quality of services and we have worked really hard to identify where we could getter better value for money for the things we buy.

“We have done this by restricting what we can purchase to those items which have been identified as being of best value; it’s not about doing things on the cheap but about ensuring the things we buy are offering real value for money which is what our local taxpayers would expect.” 

“The data from the NHS efficiency league table is welcomed to help us concentrate on purchase areas and commodities where perhaps we can improve upon our cost savings in comparison to other similar trusts”.  

The Procurement Team are currently writing a new five year strategy which will outline where further savings can be made.

17 July 2014

Sea, sun and safe sex – NHS Trust launches sexual health summertime campaign

A new sexual health campaign is being launched by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust to promote safe sex during the summer holidays.

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is encouraging people to enjoy a safe and healthy summer with the launch of a new campaign to raise awareness of the dangers of unprotected sex.

The campaign, which is being led by the Trust’s Sexual Health team, features a series of summer-themed Polaroid style photographs with messages such as “oil based lotion and lubricant can cause condoms to split”, or “severe sickness and diarrhoea can make the contraceptive pill less effective”.

These will be appearing each week on the Trust’s social networking sites throughout summer. The Trust will give facts and stats or provide advice for people who are concerned that they may have put themselves at risk of a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI) or need emergency contraception.

In addition, the Trust has been working closely with colleges and school settings, where the posters have been displayed.

Kate Wilson, Health Promotion Specialist at Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, said: “Over the summer holidays, people enjoy celebrating and may lose their inhibitions and take risks they wouldn’t usually take. This campaign is a reminder to enjoy the holiday season without regrets, to pack contraception and condoms in their holiday essentials and to practice safe sex. Many people do not realise that oil based products can cause condoms to split including sun cream and body oils. Whilst we want to encourage people to plan their contraception in advance, for those that feel they may need it, emergency contraception is available in advance from local sexual health services.”

Poster
Seual Health Poster

The social media campaign will start on Monday, July 23rd until August 24th. Follow @WorcsHealthCare and @SHEducation on Twitter and Facebook to see the updates.

If you have any concerns about your sexual health or need advice, call 0800 783 2936. For more information about contraception and STIs visit www.playinitsafe.co.uk      

For more information or if you wish to receive an electronic copy of the posters, please contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications: gary.morgan@hacw.nhs.uk or Laura Vallet, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Marketing and Communications Officer: laura.vallet@hacw.nhs.uk    

11 July 2014

Mental Health Unit Raises Money for Garden Equipment

A garden party fundraiser for mental health patients was held by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Adult Inpatient Occupational Therapy Team at the Elgar Unit, Newtown Hospital on Wednesday (9 July).

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust staff and patients were invited to Wednesday’s event, which included cake stalls, a raffle and a ‘name the bear’ competition.

The garden party helped raise £400, which will go towards garden furniture for the Occupational Therapy Department. The garden plays an important part in the therapeutic treatment of the patients and allows them to benefit from the outdoor environment. The inpatient unit currently runs two gardening groups a week, which allows its patients to cultivate seeds, plant flowers and grow vegetables.
OT  Garden Party

Rachel Smallbone, Occupational Therapist, and Beverley Powell Occupational Therapy Clinical Support Worker

Prisca Cocker, Adult Inpatient Occupational Therapy Team Leader, said: “We are delighted about the £400 we have managed to raise and would like to thank everyone who has made a contribution. This money will definitely make a difference for our patients with mental health issues, for whom spending time in the garden can have a very positive impact.”


For more information or if you wish to arrange an interview, please contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications: gary.morgan@hacw.nhs.uk or Laura Vallet, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Marketing and Communications Officer: laura.vallet@hacw.nhs.uk    

Voice for young people’s NHS services in Worcestershire celebrates first anniversary

A local NHS Youth Board which represents the county’s young people has just celebrated its first anniversary.

The Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Youth Board was set up to help ensure young people have a say and a meaningful voice when it comes to the services the Trust provides. The board meets every couple of months to discuss changes to services, to help the Trust engage with other young people and to find out more about a particular service area.

The Trust provides a range of services for children, young people and families, including its Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS), a service called SPACE which supports young people who have drugs and substance misuse issues, a service helping people who have an eating disorder and one which promotes sexual health.

So far the Board has:

  • Set up a mental health subgroup, focussing on CAMHS
  • Contributed to the Transition project aimed at improving transition between CAMHS to Adult Mental Health Services
  • Sat on an interview panel to recruit a CAMHS clinician
  • Laid the foundations for a new young peoples’ website
  • Taken part in the Trust’s first ever Takeover Day event
  • Reviewed and scrutinised new information material to go out to young people
  • Hosted senior staff and colleagues from the Trust 

 

Future plans:

  • The Board is to receive training from various partners to empower them to talk about health issues
  • The Board is discussing plans on how to talk about drug and alcohol abuse in schools
  • The Board is working to promote its work in schools and youth centres
  • The Board plans to ‘inspect’ young peoples’ services 

 

Sarah Rowe, Youth Board member, said: “The youth board has been a great experience and really helps with my confidence. It’s been nice to hear others views on many things. The support the board has given has been great as its supported me in different situations”. 

Ahmed Hussain, Community Development Officer for Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, said: “We are committed to effective and meaningful engagement with young people and we know young people often ask the questions or come up with the types of ideas we might not have even thought about. The Youth Board’s first year has been really successful and they have quickly made a valuable contribution to the Trust and some of the decisions it’s taken. As well as helping ensure young people have a voice and are well represented, it also gives members invaluable experience and supports the development of their CV.”

All meetings are strictly young people led with the Trust’s Community Development Officer providing only a supporting role.

Anyone between 14-24 who lives in an area covered by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust can join. Email ahmed.hussain@hacw.nhs.uk to register interest and to receive further information.

Worcestershire Youth Board

Members of the Youth Board celebrate their first anniversary with Trust Chief Executive Sarah Dugan, and Chairman, Chris Burdon

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust Joins Unprecedented International Effort to Raise Awareness of Communication Disorders

The Trust which supports children who have speech and language difficulties has signed up to an International campaign aimed at raising awareness of the impact communication problems can have on young people. 

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Children’s Speech and Language Therapy (SLT) Servicehas been taking part in the International Communication Project (ICP) 2014as part of a local Get Worcestershire Talking campaign, which aims to raise awareness of the impact of poor communication on outcomes for children.  

As part of the ICP, organisations and individuals across different countries have been adding their name to a pledge board to show their commitment to supporting children and their families who are affected. On Wednesday (July 9) the Trust’s Board of Directors each signed the pledge to reiterate the organisation’s on-going efforts to support the estimated 10,000 children and young people who have or are experiencing communication difficulties across Worcestershire. 

The ICP is a collaborative effort developed by the Royal College of Speech Language Therapists together with other professional bodies across the globe. It aims to raise the profile of communication disabilities with international health bodies and policy makers and to increase public awareness of the significant impact communication disabilities can have on people’s lives. To date, over 6,300 people from around the world have signed the pledge. 

Sarah Dugan, Chief Executive of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, said: “The Board heard a parent’s story about how her son’s life has been totally transformed by being given the skills to communicate. The work undertaken by our SLT service can truly make a difference in people’s lives and we were delighted to have the opportunity to highlight the Trust’s on-going commitment to supporting children and young people who have speech and language difficulties.”

Speech and Language Therapists are the lead professionals working with children and young adults with speech, language and communication difficulties. They work in partnership with parents, schools, and other professionals to reduce the impact of these difficulties and help children achieve their full potential. Last year, 2,400 Worcestershire children were referred to the service, with over 6,000 children known to the SLT Service at any moment in time.

The SLT team has been encouraging practitioners and colleagues across Worcestershire to sign the pledge as a way of helping to bring attention to children and young people with communication disorders and the practical support that can help them. So far, more than 250 signatures have been collected in Worcestershire. 

Emma Jordan, Service Manager said: “Improving a child’s language dramatically improves their life chances. For example, there is no better predictor of a child’s GCSE results at 16 than their vocabulary at 5.”
Children's Speech and Language Therapy

Chris Burdon, Chairman of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, and Sarah Dugan, Chief Executive (left) signed the ICP pledge on Wednesday 9 July.


For more info on the Children’s Speech and Language Therapy, please visit
http://www.hacw.nhs.uk/our-services/speech-language-therapy/childrens/
Holt Ward Opening

June 27, 2014

Worcester MP cuts the ribbon on new mental health ward 

A new ward for those who have a serious mental health problem has been opened by Worcester MP Robin Walker. 

Holt Ward, which is run by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust - the county’s main provider of community and mental health services - is being re-located from its home in the Aconbury Unit to a new base at the Elgar Unit along Newtown Road in Worcester. 

On Friday (June 27) staff were joined by Robin Walker MP as well as other interested stakeholders to open the new-look ward, which has undergone a major refurbishment and which boasts a new outdoor environment which will support patients on their road to recovery. 

The old Holt Ward was recently accredited by the Royal College of Psychiatrists in recognition for the excellent care and support staff provided. The accreditation considered all aspects of care and made recommendations where things might be even better. In response to this, and some feedback from patients, families and carers, the Trust invested around £800k to re-locate the ward to the Elgar Unit where it now opens out to a garden which staff believe will further enhance the overall patient experience. The investment has also been used to completely refurbish the indoor space, providing a modern and contemporary environment. 

Holt Ward Outside

Robin Walker MP said: “On previous visits to the Holt Ward I was hugely impressed by the care I saw. I am in awe of the dedicated staff who work in the mental health sector providing such vital support to people at times of great need. However, there were challenges with the previous location up on the first floor and with limited outside space. The new ward looks fantastic, with top of the range facilities, a tranquil garden, and different views from every window. Both patients and staff deserve this improved facility and I have no doubt it will improve the patient experience.” 

Chris Burdon, Chairman of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, said: “This is a really exciting development which is part of our commitment to providing excellent patient care across all our settings. It represents a significant investment in the quality of care provided for those mental health patients who can’t safely be supported in the community and who therefore require hospital care.” 

Marisa Manning, Holt Ward Manager, added: “We expect that being able to use the outdoor garden space throughout their stay on the new ward will have a very positive impact on our patients, improving the overall experience and supporting their recovery process.” 

www.hacw.nhs.uk/

June 2014

Healthwatch backs Trust’s whistleblowing campaign 

The Trust which provides the majority of community and mental health NHS services in Worcestershire has launched a campaign to remind its own staff to speak up if something isn’t right. 

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, which counts the county’s five community hospitals as part of its diverse portfolio of services, is launching a series of posters urging staff to ‘blow the whistle’ and to report any shortcomings in patient care. The ‘If it’s not right, speak up’ campaign will see hard hitting posters displayed across the trust, reminding staff that it’s their responsibility to raise any concerns if they believe standards are not being met. 

The posters feature potentially vulnerable patients and carers urging the Trust’s staff to stand up for them and tell someone if the care they are receiving isn’t good enough, and Sandra Brennan, the Trust’s Director of Nursing, said it was vital in any NHS organisation to have an environment where staff feel confident to raise concerns: “As a Trust we encourage any staff member who has a patient safety concern to raise this within the organisation at the earliest opportunity. All the information and evidence we collate from talking to patients , family members and carers suggests quite clearly the care we provide meets the really high standards we set, however that doesn’t mean we should be complacent and shouldn’t always strive to do better. We really value our staff who work hard in what is a demanding environment, but it is important they are reminded of their responsibilities when it comes to whistleblowing.” 

Peter Pinfield, Chair of Healthwatch Worcestershire, said:It is really important that staff are confident to raise any concerns they might have regarding the care a patient is receiving. Often staff are in the best place to notice if something isn’t good enough or at the standard we would all expect so speaking out and raising the alarm is vital to ensuring poor practice is highlighted wherever it occurs. The Health and Care Trust is right to remind its staff of their responsibilities and we welcome the campaign they’ve launched.” 

The Trust has also recently put its name to the Nursing Times’ Speak out Safely initiative which aims to encourage NHS organisations and independent healthcare providers to develop cultures that are honest and transparent, to actively encourage staff to raise the alarm when they see poor practice, and to protect them when they do so.

www.hacw.nhs.uk/

10 June 2014

CBEEBIES’ RHYME ROCKET CREW TO VISIT MALVERN NURSERY 

As part of their ‘Get Worcestershire Talking’ campaign, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Children’s Speech and Language Therapy Service hasbeen running a rhyming competition for Early Years Settings across the county. The winning nursery will receive its fantastic prize on 16th June 2014. CBeebies’ Rhyme Rocket crew Professor Poet and First Officer Ditty will be arriving at the nursery at 13:30 to entertain the children and to collect the winning rhyme. 

Experts in speech, language, and communication disorders
Speech and Language Therapists are the lead professionals working with children with speech, language and communication difficulties. They work in partnership with parents, schools, and other professionals to reduce the impact of these difficulties and help children achieve their full potential.

Last year, 2,400 Worcestershire children were referred to the service, which was redesigned in 2011. It provides support to preschool children in the form of: 

  • Talking Walk-in sessions in Children’s Centres across the county,

  • Drop-in sessions for parents - 170 parents have dropped in to get advice in the last 3 months alone,

  • Every Child a Talker programme* for Early Years Settings.

 

An Educational Initiative

The Rhyme Rocket Competition was launched in May throughout Worcestershire as part of the Service’s ‘Get Worcestershire Talking’ campaign, which aims to raise awareness of the impact of poor communication on outcomes for children.

Improving a child’s language dramatically improves their life chances and the competition aimed to raise awareness in preschool settings of how rhyming can help to develop children’s talking.

Emma Jordan, Service Manager said: “rhyming is a great way to get children to have fun with language and listen to the sounds in words. Not only does it help them to develop their language skills, but it is also great preparation for literacy. Research tells us that toddlers that rhyme become children that read.”

A fantastic prize
Dozens of nurseries and Children’s Centres across the county rose to the challenge to put their setting into a nursery rhyme. The standard of entries was very high but the service was most impressed with the entry from Brighter Futures, a nursery in the Malvern area, which won with the following rhyme:


Pirates like to go “Aaaaaaahaaaaa!”
They like to sail in ships
And wear their favourite underpants
While eating fish n’ chips
Pirates use their telescopes
To look for pirate gold
We made this poem at Brighter Futures
We’re only 3 years old!

The nursery will receive a visit and enjoy a short performance from the original cast of the CBeebies television programme Rhyme Rocket - Professor Poet and First Officer Ditty. The popular programme aims to harness the power of poetry as a pre-literacy tool for 4-5 year olds, a goal that is in line with SLT’s mission. The visit will take place at:

Brighter Futures Nursery
Bluebell Close, PoolBrook Centre
Malvern WR14 3SW

Follow Worcestershire Speech and Language Therapy on Facebook and Twitter (@SLT_Worcs).

If you wish to attend the visit or to arrange an interview, please contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications: gary.morgan@hacw.nhs.uk or Laura Vallet, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Marketing and Communications Officer: laura.vallet@hacw.nhs.uk    

 

* A year-long programme to support nursery staff in developing children's language. It has a proven track record in significantly reducing the numbers of children who are at risk of language delay.

STIs CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK DURING WORLD CUP 

World Cup 2014 Sexual Health Campaign

As the FIFA World Cup is about to kick off, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is encouraging supporters to enjoy a safe tournament with the launch of a new social media campaign to raise awareness of STIs and promote safer sex. 

A social media campaign…
Kate Wilson, Health Promotion Specialist at Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, said: “For many the World Cup is a great social as well as sporting event and it is important that people stay safe while enjoying the tournament. Our objective is to encourage those who are sexually active to practice safe sex and raise awareness about the risks of STIs, as well as to provide information about the help and advice we offer across Worcestershire”.

1 in 10 British aged 18 to 34 admitted drinking so much alcohol while watching sporting events that they could not remember what they did afterwards.

The Trust will be sharing a series of football-themed posters with key messages reminding that “STIs can affect your performance” and the importance of condom use. These will be shared via Twitter and Facebook ahead of each England match, along with the hashtag #fulltimeforSTIs. Each post will provide advice for people who wish to learn more about sexual health or are concerned that they may have put themselves at risk of pregnancy or infection.

The social media campaign will start on Wednesday, June 11th. Follow @WorcsHealthCare on Twitter and on Facebook to see the updates.

… in line with Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust ongoing efforts

The Trust’s Sexual Health service provides free and confidential support on a range of issues, including contraception, free condoms, testing and treatment for STIs. The service offers sensitive, considerate and non-judgmental care which aims to meet the needs of the County population including young people, minority groups and those with specialist contraceptive reproductive health care needs.

Up to one third of people living in the UK with HIV don't know that they have it. Every 5 Minutes someone in the UK is diagnosed with Chlamydia.

 Services are provided through open access clinics based across Worcestershire in a variety of locations. Domiciliary home visiting is also available.  The service also provides specialist education and training to nurses, GPs and allied healthcare professionals.

For further information about sexual health and local services, visit www.playinitsafe.co.ukor follow @SHEducation.

For more information or to arrange interviews, contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications: gary.morgan@hacw.nhs.uk or Laura Vallet, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Marketing and Communications Officer: laura.vallet@hacw.nhs.uk    

  MALVERN DEDICATED DENTAL CLINIC MAKES ANXIOUS PATIENTS SMILE

The UK’s National Smile Month started on May 19 to raise awareness of important health issues and ultimately improve the UK’s oral health. One of the key messages of the campaign is to visit your dentist regularly. Yet, many patients keep postponingdental treatment due to their fear of dentistry. This led Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust to develop a service entirely dedicated to patients with dental anxiety.

What is Dental Anxiety? 

Dental Anxiety can be described as a state of uneasiness and apprehension associated with the dental environment or dental procedures. Dental anxiety can be extremely debilitating as people may avoid attending the dentist for many years.

36% of adult patients suffer with moderate dental anxiety - 12% of adults have extreme dental anxiety (Adult Dental Health Survey 2009)

Anxiety may be triggered by associations with the smell of the dental surgery, the sound of the dental drill or the sight of an injection. The mere thought of seeing a dentist can result in unpleasant symptoms of sweating and trembling. Some people feel nauseous and may feel panicky in the dental surgery.

A dedicated clinic with extra-qualified professionals

As part of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, the Dental Anxiety Management Service was created in February 2013 to support people who are anxious about dental care. The clinic is based in Malvern and its team consists in 4 dentists and 5 qualified dental nurses.

Dental Anxiety Team
The team is trained in techniques to help patients accept routine dental care and make them feel more comfortable. Anwen Greaves, Senior Dental Officer, said: “We provide inhalation sedation[1] to children and adults with mild anxiety, and intravenous sedation[2] to patients with more severe forms of anxiety. Both treatments make patients feel more relaxed, enabling dental treatment to be provided in a supportive environment”.  Around 10 patients a week receive intravenous sedation, while others are provided with other treatments.

A personal approach

A patient may be offered Behavioural Management sessions, which are provided by dental nurses with specific training. These are one-to-one discussions meant to help patients understand how their fears. have developed and ultimately provide them with the coping skills and the confidence necessary to access dental care in the community.

Personal dental support is provided to each patient through techniques such as “Tell-Show-Do” and acclimatisation. These aim to make patients more familiar and comfortable with the dental environment by explaining and showing them how the procedure will be performed before doing so. Such techniques are based on an interactive and communicative approach between the dentist and the patient. 

The dentist and dental nurse take time to explain a procedure and explore dental anxiety. This approach is much appreciated by the patients. Thus John, a new patient, said “I felt much more comfortable at this service. I felt like I was given much more time that at my regular dental practice, where you have to hurry because there are 3 more patients in the waiting room”.

Practical information

Patients must be referred by a healthcare professional.
For more information, visit http://www.hacw.nhs.uk/our-services/dental-services/dental-anxiety-management-service/ or call on: 01684 612754. 

For more information or to arrange interviews, contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications: gary.morgan@hacw.nhs.uk or Laura Vallet, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Marketing and Communications Officer: laura.vallet@hacw.nhs.uk

[1] Also known as “laughing gas”, a mixture of nitrous oxide and oxygen breathed through a nosepiece. 

[2] The administration of an anti-anxiety drug.

 

Exciting apprenticeship posts with NHS across Worcester

New apprenticeship opportunities

Recruitment campaigns have started again to recruit a new cohort of apprentices to start in September working for both Worcestershire Health & Care NHS Trust and other partner organisations such as GP Surgeries, Local CCGs and NHS England. These opportunities are for Business Administration apprenticeships and could cover a wide range of roles, including Receptionists and Secretaries. The closing date for applications for these opportunities is 26th June 2014.

A successful last cohort

Recently, the Trust celebrated the latest cohort of apprentices successfully completing their apprenticeship with a Certificate Awards Ceremony.  Louise Seeney, Deputy Training & Development Manager, congratulated everyone, recognising the hard work of everyone involved, including the great support provided by the line manager and mentors.

 

Apprenticeships

We are proud to report that Cohort 9 also marked the 100th successfully completed apprenticeship since the programme began in 2009.  Sophie Harber (pictured centre) undertook her apprenticeship in Business Administration whilst working for St Martin’s Gate Surgery in Worcester and has now been successful in getting a full-time post with them.

Positive results

Over the last 4 years the Trust has recruited 140 apprentices and this cohort undertook apprenticeships in Business Administration.  80% of completers from the most recent cohort have gone on to get jobs with either the Trust or another NHS organisation once their apprenticeship finished.

Penny West, Workforce Transformation Manager, said:

“Apprenticeships are a wonderful, rare opportunity for young people to start their career in the NHS, obtain qualifications and invaluable experience – they allow us to nurture and develop the skills of young people to enable them to become our future workforce”.

You can find out more about the Trust’s apprenticeship scheme by going to www.hacw.nhs.uk/work-for-us/apprenticeship-scheme or Facebook (www.facebook.com/nhsapprenticeships) and Twitter (@NHSApprentices). Alternatively, please contact Stephen Brown:  01905 681663 or apprenticeships@hacw.nhs.uk

For more information or to arrange interviews, contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications: gary.morgan@hacw.nhs.uk or Laura Vallet, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Marketing and Communications Officer: laura.vallet@hacw.nhs.uk    
Shape
Members of the SHAPE team in Worcestershire limbering up

Healthy bodies and minds thanks to local partnership

A project supporting local young people who have a mental illness get active and healthy has received a boost after being named as part of a national programme encouraging more innovative approaches to improving healthcare.

The Health Foundation has just selected 23 projects for its improvement programme called Shine. The programme funds innovative healthcare teams to test new solutions to improving the quality of healthcare nationwide.

One of them is a Programme called SHAPE (Supporting Health and Promoting Exercise), which is being run in a partnership between Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust - the county’s main provider of NHS mental health services - the University of Worcester, Worcestershire County Council’s Public Health Department and South Worcestershire Clinical Commissioning Group.

SHAPE is a physical health programme aimed at young people across Worcestershire who have Psychosis or Bipolar Disorder and is being run from Worcester University’s McClelland Centre for Health and Wellbeing, which is equipped with state-of-the-art gym equipment.

Through group and individual exercise and wellbeing sessions, it encourages young people with Psychosis to be active, get and stay physically fit and to generally lead more healthy lifestyles which will help prevent things like diabetes and cardio-vascular problems which are often associated with younger people with mental ill health.

Shape

SHAPE brings together healthcare professionals including Sports Therapists, Exercise Physiologists, Nutritionists and Health Trainers and gets young people to support each other through a 12 week exercise, health and fitness programme followed by continued free gym membership at McClelland Centre for 12 months. Other activities include football, basketball and badminton which will take place at the University’s new sports centre, the Arena.

Professor Jo Smith, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Consultant Psychologist and Early Intervention Lead, said: “Young people with psychosis are at a much higher risk than their peers for developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Some of this is related to lifestyle in that they are more likely to be cigarette smokers, tend to have poorer diets  and  can lead more sedentary lifestyles, and some is related to the medications that are used to treat their psychosis which can lead to weight gain and other metabolic changes. We know from emerging research evidence internationally that if we make young people aware of this right from the start we can encourage them to start addressing these lifestyle factors as well as encouraging them to eat well and keep active. This is the rationale behind our SHAPE (Supporting Health and Promoting Exercise) initiative here in Worcestershire. We are one of the first health services in the UK and internationally to do something like this.”

There are over 60 new cases of a first episode of psychosis per year across Worcestershire. SHAPE is available to all young people with a first episode of  psychosis living within the county of Worcestershire and under the Worcestershire Early Intervention Service Briony Williams, Head of Applied Social Science Academic Unit and manager of the  McClelland Wellbeing centre at the University of Worcester said: “The SHAPE project is an exciting venture for the University of Worcester we have developed a positive working relationship with the Early Intervention Service and are looking forward to this project. McClelland Centre staff are experienced at delivering supported lifestyle change that involves health measurement, group exercise and nutrition advice. The project will provide valuable placement opportunities for University of Worcester students.”

Each of the Shine projects will receive up to £75,000 of funding to support the implementation and evaluation of their work

Anxiety on the agenda during Mental Health Awareness Week

Mental health problems are something which effect other people - right. 

Well, that’s wrong - the latest figures show that about one in four of us in the UK will experience a mental health problem, like anxiety, each year. 

This week is Mental Health Awareness Week and Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust – which provides mental health care in the area - is hoping to make more people aware of anxiety and how it can impact on our lives. 

Anxiety is a type of fear usually associated with the thought of a threat or something going wrong in the future, but it can also arise from something happening right now. The latest figures from the Mental Health Foundation show that 56 per cent of people think we are more anxious today than we were five years ago. In Worcestershire, about 50,000 people suffer from common mental health problems at any one time, with anxiety and depression making up the majority. Anxiety is perfectly normal and in small amounts can help us deal with day to day problems, like how to respond to an emergency. But unchecked it can cause long-term health problems which affect our ability to deal with everyday life. The signs of anxiety include dizziness, trouble sleeping, a lack of concentration, feeling irritable or experiencing a loss of self-confidence. Just knowing what makes you anxious and why can be the first steps to managing anxiety. Talking it through with family and friends can be helpful. Learning relaxation techniques, like yoga or meditation, can also help you calm your feelings, as can exercise, healthy eating and avoiding alcohol. But if you feel like anxiety is taking over your life then it’s a good idea to ask for professional help. 

Mark Dickens, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Lead for Adult Mental Health, said: “Everyone has feelings of anxiety at some point. It is normal to experience anxiety in everyday situations, however persistent and excessive anxiety can cause more serious mental health problems.” 

About 9,000 people with common mental health problems were referred to Worcestershire’s Primary Care Mental Health Service (PCMHS) over the last financial year and 3,600 patients started psychological therapies. Roughly half of these referrals were for the treatment of anxiety. 

PCMHS, which is run by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, offers mental health assessment, mental health support, signposting to other services and psychological therapies.Typical anxiety problems include generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder; obsessive compulsion disorder (OCD), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), social anxiety (Social Phobia) and health anxiety. 

Talking therapies, like cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), have proved very effective for people with anxiety problems, as has guided self-help, while medication is used to provide short-term help. There are also support groups which bring together people with similar experiences to share stories, tips and to try out new ways of managing their anxiety.

One of the important things to remember if you are suffering from anxiety is that you are not alone and that there is help out there – you just need to ask. You can find out more about anxiety and how to develop positive coping strategies by going to www.mentalhealth.org.uk

For more information or to arrange interviews, contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications at gary.morgan@hacw.nhs.uk

Every Picture Tells a Story - Mental Health Patients Put Their Work on Display

The secrets of digital photography have opened up a new world for members of a mental health support group.

Members of Worcester’s Shrub Hill Workshop, which is run by the Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, signed up for a 15-week course which taught them to focus on the practical side of taking a good photo, choosing a subject and looking at composition. 

The budding David Baileys explored the city’s Commandery, the river Severn, cathedral and city centre and the results were so impressive that the photographs will now be going on show as part of a special exhibition. 

“There have been nothing but positive comments from the group saying that they have enjoyed all the sessions and that their confidence and ability to think about and take photographs has improved,” said course leader Brian Bullock. 

The Shrub Hill Workshop provides a service for people in mental health recovery as a step towards college, employment, volunteering or other community- based activities including woodwork, IT, office skills, art and literacy. 

The display will be held at the Commandery, Worcester, from May 10-18. A second 15-week course is due to start on May 29.

Note to Editors
For more information contact Gary Morgan, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Head of Communications on 01905 733632

Trust Reaffirms Commitment to Care in the Community

The County’s main provider of mental health NHS services is committed to caring for more people with mental health problems at home or closer to home. 

This commitment comes following a national report claiming too many people with illnesses such as psychosis or schizophrenia are being admitted to hospital. 

The report, from mental health charity, Rethink, claims the NHS could save millions if more mentally ill patients were cared for within the community rather than in hospital. Locally that is the direction Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust has been travelling on for a number of years, with investment in community based mental health nursing teams, and early intervention and prevention services reducing the number of inpatient admissions across the county. 

Recent figures for example show that 22% more people were successfully cared for in their own homes by the Trust in 2013/14 compared to the previous year. Also 35% fewer patients under the care of the trust’s Home Treatment teams required Psychiatric Hospital admission over the same period. 

This approach has been described by Health Minister Norman Lamb as “the best option” for people who are mentally ill as it means they are often in familiar surroundings and amongst loved ones which can help to benefit recovery. 

Mark Dickens, Adult Mental Health lead for Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust said “If we can we always look to treat people at home or within their local community because it is usually of the greatest benefit to them rather than taking them out of their comfort zone and admitting them to a ward. Patients tell us they want to be cared for at home and there is real evidence that people’s recovery can be accelerated when given the right care for them in the most appropriate place, and that is often in a familiar environment.” 

For more information contact Gary Morgan, Head of Communications, at Gary.Morgan@hacw.nhs.uk
Colin Philips

7th March 2014

Non-Executive Director Standing Down

Colin Phillips has announced that he will be standing down from his role as Non-Executive Director with Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust on 31 March 2014.  

Mr Phillips was initially appointed as a Non-Executive Director with the Board of Worcestershire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust in November 2007.  On the establishment of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust on 1 July 2011 he was appointed to the Board of this organisation.  

Chairman of the Board, Chris Burdon said “I wish to thank Colin for his commitment to local mental health and community services over the last 6 years. On behalf of the Board I wish him well for the future.”  

Mr Phillips intends to pursue a range of other interests and has not ruled out applying for other Non-Executive Director positions in the future.

Bryher Stafford at Kidderminster Train Station

5th March 2014 

Leaving the Car at Home and Walking in the Patients Shoes 

A nurse supporting people with Learning Disabilities and Epilepsy swapped her car for public transport to better understand the challenges her patients face. 

Bryher Stafford, who works for Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, took part in the Trust’s ‘Walk in their Shoes Day’ this week - an initiative to help staff better understand what being a patient is really like. 

People with Learning Disabilities generally have to rely on other people or public transport to get around, while those with epilepsy are also legally unable to drive so public transport is often the only option they have too. Bryher, who lives in Kidderminster caught the train to Redditch and then hopped on and off the bus to visit patients in their own homes or to attend community clinics in the town. 

She admitted the experience made her more aware of some of logistical and practical challenges her patients face: “We often get people requesting later clinic appointments so it fits in with the bus timetable, or they request a home visit because they find it difficult getting out at all. To get a better understanding of how it really feels I thought I would leave my car at home for the day and use public transport.  During the day I realised that everything takes a lot longer when using public transport, from planning my route to reading various timetables.  I also had to make sure I took everything I needed with me – normally my car contains spare coats, umbrella, lunch, bottles of water, notebooks, any equipment I might need.  

Bryher Stafford

“It has definitely made me appreciate the time and effort it can take patients to get to an appointment and I feel like I have gained another level of understanding when it comes to the challenges they face.” 

Walk in their Shoes Day is the Trust’s local take on the national NHS Change Day initiative which asks staff from across the health service to pledge to do something to improve patient care. Elsewhere staff drank out of beaker for the day, were fed by colleagues, wore a sling and spent time in a wheelchair as part of the initiative. 

Sarah Dugan, Chief Executive of Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, said: “We know that patients generally experience excellent levels of care and treatment in our services but that doesn’t mean we are complacent and we recognise there is always more we can do. Walk in their Shoes Day is a chance for our staff to experience some of those things which might seem small, such as transport problems, difficulties being fed or having your arm in a sling, but actually make a real difference to the whole patient experience. We hope that this will help us to gain an insight into how it feels to be a patient and give our staff a different perspective.” 

For More Staff Photo's from 'Walk in Their Shoes Day - Click Here

www.hacw.nhs.uk

Princess of Wales Community Hospital

Be a part of Community Hospital’s bright new future 

Bromsgrove’s community hospital is on the search for new recruits as part of plans to strengthen the role it plays in the delivery of local health services. 

The Princess of Wales Community Hospital is run by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, which is the county’s main provider of community and mental health NHS services. As well as the Princess of Wales, the Health and Care Trust also runs community hospitals in Malvern, Evesham, Pershore and Tenbury. The Trust is embarking on plans to strengthen the role they play in local communities. 

In the Princess of Wales this includes ensuring it is equipped with the necessary skills to care for and treat people with more complex health issues. It also means the community hospital will be well placed to meet the new staffing level requirements following the recent Francis Inquiry. This is part of the Trust’s drive to provide more care and support closer to peoples’ homes. 

The site’s Cottage and Lickey Wards are in need of more registered qualified nurses to support the patients who are admitted. To help encourage potential new recruits, two Recruitment Days have been organised giving interested people the chance to have a look around the hospital and to learn more about the role and development plans. 

Phil Shakeshaft, Matron at the Princess of Wales, said: “The Recruitment Days will give you a chance to find out more about the hospital’s development plans, as well as the services currently provided, and will give you a chance to see if you have the skills and passion to be a part of the hospital’s future. You will learn about the Trust’s commitment to on-going training and development of its staff, hear more about the nursing roles we are recruiting for and have a tour of the Lickey and Cottage Wards where successful applicants will be working on.” 

Recruitment Days are on Thursday, March 6th from 2pm until 4pm and on Saturday, March 8th from 10am until 12noon. Attendance is free but you must register for the day if you wish to attend. You can do so by phone on 01905 681548 or by completing a short online form available on the Trust’s website – www.hacw.nhs.uk. Applications will be accepted through the NHS Jobs website and further information/support about how to apply will be provided on the day. For more information contact Matron, Phil Shakeshaft on (07918695282). Register Here

More out of hospital support for people with eating disorders 

More people who have an eating disorder in Worcestershire are getting the support they need at home or out of hospital, with referrals into community-based services increasing in recent years. 

The Worcestershire Eating Disorder Service is run by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, the county’s main provider of community and mental health NHS services. It has revealed a rise in the number of people being referred, with figures increasing by 48% since 2005. 

The rise in referrals is attributed to a mix of increased awareness among the public and professionals both of eating disorders in general, but also of the out-of-hospital care and support provided locally by the Trust.  

The service works with people in the community and receives around 210 referrals per year. It offers wide ranging help and the team tailor each care plan to suit the needs of every individual. They can offer sufferers individual counselling, a course of cognitive behavioural therapy, food and nutrition guidance, group work and can also provide support with self-help manuals.  

This week is national Eating Disorders Week and recent figures show that in the UK alone 1.6 million people are suffering from related illnesses. Figures also suggest an increase in the number of people with eating disorders being admitted to hospital, which isn’t a trend being followed here in Worcestershire, possibly due to the effectiveness of community-based care. 

Kay Lobo, the Health and Care Trust’s Eating Disorder Service Clinical Manager, said the service was geared up to providing early community-based support which reduced the risk of people getting so poorly they needed hospital treatment: “Early intervention and treatment can help a sufferer recover more quickly and either prevent hospital admission or shorten the length of their stay,” she said.  

“Getting help and being treated early can also help to prevent some of the long term health issues which can be caused by an eating disorder. People who develop eating disorders can struggle with a variety of difficulties, it’s not just people who are under weight. An eating disorder is about an unhealthy pre-occupation with food, body shape and weight  often characterised by irrational thoughts and beliefs  and a critical evaluation of themselves. These disorders present the sufferer with complex problems, physically, psychologically and socially.” 

More than half of those suffering with an eating disorder have been diagnosed with EDNOS (eating disorder not otherwise specified) which is a general term and means that their disorder does not fit the criteria for anorexia or bulimia – however this does not make them any less ill than those suffering from the two main identifiable eating disorders. 

In addition to the 1.6 million people who have been diagnosed nationally, there are those who are living with an eating disorder and haven’t had the help they need. For many, eating disorders can go undetected for long periods of time due to a determination from the sufferer to hide their illness and also because signs of an eating disorder can be identified as something else and go untreated. 

People who think they may be suffering from an eating disorder should speak to their GP who can make a referral to the Eating Disorder service if appropriate. You can get more information about eating disorders at http://www.b-eat.co.uk/

Peer Support Workers
Holt Ward's Peer Support Workers

Pilot scheme reaping benefits for mental health patients in Worcester 

It is said that one of the best ways to deal with your problems is to talk to those who have walked in your shoes and this philosophy is being embraced right here in Worcester through a new pilot scheme delivering real, tangible benefits for local people with serious mental ill health.

Holt Ward is an 18 bedded mental health in-patient unit for adults whose illness cannot safely be treated at home or in the community. It is based on the Newtown Hospital site and in October last year Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust which runs it launched a new Peer Support pilot scheme to help the ward’s patients on their road to recovery.

Peer Support sees people with a lived experience of mental illness provide help to those struggling with similar problems. As part of the pilot four Peer Support workers were employed by the Health and Care Trust to work alongside staff on the ward. Jodie, Joy, Mark and Paul have completed a rigorous Peer Support training programme and provide a different type of support which complements the professional nurses and doctors on the ward. Support may be social, emotional or practical and focuses on an individual’s strengths not weaknesses, and works towards the individual’s wellbeing and recovery.

All four Peer Supporters have a history of mental illness but are now in a position to help those suffering with a serious or acute episode which requires them to be on a ward.

Mark said each of the Peer Support workers looked at the role in their own unique way, but he explained how their interactions with patients helped them open up in a way busy staff might find more difficult: “The doctors and nurses do a really good job but often the conversations they have with patients are all about their mental state and physical wellbeing from a medical perspective. As Peer Support workers we have the time to talk to patients as people first and foremost. We can talk about their families, their work, hobbies and other interests and we regularly find that people are more willing to open up, share more about how they are feeling, and what makes them feel worried or anxious. This can give us a really unique insight to that person and we can work with the staff to share this information which can contribute to their longer-term recovery.”  Mark has links in the community with Rainbow Autism CIC and the National Autistic Society, Hereford and Worcester.

Jodie was actually a patient on Holt Ward a few years ago. She said after overcoming her initial nervousness about going back to work in the place where she was at her lowest, she has found the whole experience had helped her regain a sense of meaning and worth to her life: “I think one of the advantages of Peer Support is that you are a real, living example that things do get better. I remember when I was in Holt Ward I was really low and although the treatment I received from the staff was really good, it was difficult to see too many positives or have any real motivation. Hopefully by talking to patients and telling them ‘this was me a few years ago’ it provides them with hope that you can recover, you can work and lead a more fulfilling life and I think this element combined with the care and support provided by the staff has the potential to be really effective.”  Coming out of hospital she finished her degree and now also does volunteering in the community.

Joy has struggled with mental illnesses for much of her adult life impacting on her relationships and career in scientific research. Since moving to Worcestershire she has gained employment in administration in the Trust and is also an associate lecturer and researcher at the University of Worcester, both of which she combines with her Peer Support role. “The patients we work with bring out skills and strengths in all of us which we probably didn’t know existed. It is about using our own experiences to good use, instead of just saying we’ve experienced mental ill health we can give other people some tools to help them get through some really dark days.”  Joy also does advocacy and other volunteering work in the community.

Paul’s mental health difficulties resulted in him giving up his own business and work with West Mercia Probation. He described the Peer Support Worker role as “gaining an understanding and empathy between two people” but talked about the importance of balancing a working relationship between clinical staff and the person on the ward: “We are walking a bit of a tightrope when building a peer relationship with people on the ward, this in turn gives us the unique ability to share thoughts and feelings which they may have kept to themselves.  The peer relationship also helps clinical staff as a deep sense of respect and honesty helps when passing relevant information on to the ward team.  Informing people about this makes them feel more comfortable with sharing experiences with us peers and forms the basis of their own recovery journey as trust and respect is valued when receiving peer support.”

All four of Holt Ward’s Peer Support workers cite the excellent relationship they have with staff. They can be present on staff ward rounds, and they hold regular meeting with the nurses and doctors who work on the ward.

Marisa Manning, Holt Ward Manager, said: “Working with the Peer Supporters on the ward has been a fresh approach to working with patients.   Patients have given me good feedback of the work the Peer Supporters are doing with them, the inpatient consultant has been requesting their presence in ward reviews where he thinks they can help a patient’s recovery and the Peer Supporters are now coming into their own.   One of the peer supporters has specialist knowledge of Asperger’s and he helped the ward staff devise ways of working with a specific patient and helped the nursing team understand the challenges we were experiencing. He has been a great asset as although some staff have had training in Asperger’s the knowledge he can bring to the team is invaluable. Holt’s nursing team is very adaptable and I am proud how they have embraced Peer Support.  A new team and service being set up on a busy acute ward has been challenging, but the impact has been very tangible. “

The current pilot scheme comes to an end later this year, but managers hope to roll our Peer Support across Holt Ward and other relevant services longer-term.
Is A&E For Me?

Take Your Minor Injury to Our Minor Injury Units 

Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is urging people who have a minor injury such as a fracture or a cut to get it treated at one of the county’s Minor Injury Units, where the average waiting time is less than 20 minutes! 

Winter is traditionally a busier time in the NHS but current demand at the county’s two Accident and Emergency departments – at the Worcestershire Royal and Alexandra Hospitals – has been described as “unprecedented”. Therefore Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust is urging those with more minor injuries which don’t require emergency treatment to attend local Minor Injury Units, where the wait to be seen is just a fraction of what can be expected at A&E. This will free up more capacity at A&E allowing staff to provide emergency care and treatment to those who really need it.  

Average waiting times at MIUs are typically around 20 minutes which means that even if you have to travel a little further than you would to A&E, it's likely you will still be seen, treated and be home much quicker. MIU’s have trained nurses and can treat patients with a wide range of minor injuries including cuts, grazes, wounds, sprains, strains, minor burns and broken bones. 

The Health and Care Trust runs MIU’s at The Princess of Wales Community Hospital in Bromsgrove, and at the Community Hospitals in Evesham, Malvern, and Tenbury. Opening times can be found at www.hacw.nhs.uk. There is also a Minor Injury Unit on the site of Kidderminster Hospital which is run by the Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust. 

Local NHS managers are urging people to think carefully about whether they really need emergency care. 

Matt Stringer, Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust’s Community Care Lead, said: “We know that there is a significant number of people who go to A&E with a minor injury which can be treated much quicker at one of the Minor Injury Units. On average people wait around 20 minutes to be seen at an MIU and if more people with minor injuries use this service it would free up capacity at A&E so our colleagues there can support those people who do need emergency care. If you are unsure whether your injury can be treated at an MIU then you can call in advance and a member of staff will be able to advise.” 

Contact details are:

Bromsgrove MIU - 01527 488058

Evesham MIU - 01386 502388

Malvern MIU - 01684 612619

Tenbury MIU - 01584 810643

Kidderminster – 01562 513039 

Stewart Messer, Chief Operating Officer at Worcestershire Acute Hospitals NHS Trust, said: “Demand for A&E services across the both sites is at unprecedented levels. We are working with colleagues across the health and social care community to try and ease the situation. Measures in place include opening an additional 12 beds at the Worcestershire Royal site over the weekend, in addition to the 76 extra beds that have been opened across the two hospitals over the last few weeks, and GP support in the Acute Medical Units and Emergency Departments. Across the county work is also being done to ensure easier access to community hospital and social care beds for those patients who no longer need acute hospital care. Patients can do their bit ensuring that they only come to A&E if it is absolutely necessary. For alternative healthcare options in Worcestershire visit www.isaandeforme.com or download the app.” 

For more information contact Gary Morgan, Head of Communications at Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, on 01905 733632
Mental health facility passes inspection with flying colours

Mental Health Facility Passes Inspection With Flying Colours

Tudor Lodge in Bromsgrove, a long-term residential unit for people with long standing mental health problems, has passed an inspection by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) with flying colours.

The CQC visited Tudor Lodge, which is run by Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust, earlier this month in an unannounced routine inspection. As part of this inspection, the CQC looked at the personal care or treatment records of people who use the service and observed how people were being cared for. Views of staff and those who use the service were also sought.

In the report of the inspection, the CQC noted that people told the inspectors things like: “I am happy living here” and felt that their individual needs were being met by the staff. They also said that they felt safe and it was observed that the staff had a “kind and caring approach towards the people they supported”.  The CQC also said that people were listened to and received a consistent level of care that met their individual needs.

Tudor Lodge met standards on all five statements considered by the CQC when carrying out an inspection, these are: Respecting and involving people who use services, care and welfare of people who use services, safeguarding people who use services from abuse, requirements relating to workers, assessing and monitoring the quality of service provision. 

Mark Dickens, Adult Mental Health lead for Worcestershire Health and Care NHS Trust said: “We are very pleased with the outcome of this inspection and feel that it highlights the hard work that is put in to ensure those using services at Tudor Lodge receive the very best care. 

“This also shows consistency within our mental health inpatient services as it comes off the back of five of our wards receiving Royal College of Psychiatrists accreditations, four of them accredited as “excellent”.